It’s rare that I don’t make a couple of batches of homemade salsa duringthe tomato season: for me, it is the most versatile and flavourful ofcondiments and can be used as the basis for many meals. Still, I often endup with half-eaten jars of mild and medium salsa competing for fridge spacewith the BBQ sauce…

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This week, I am giving thought to the various jars of pickles left on basein my fridge. Not just the usual cuke suspects: I’ve also accumulatedpickled beets, beans, and carrots in my summer preserving travels. Oftenforgotten in the mad rush to get food on the table, these pickle stragglerscan add zesty flavour to any meal!…

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This month, I am giving thought to all the annoying half-filled jars ofpreserves that haunt my fridge door (and maybe yours, too). Orphaned jarsof jams, relishes, pickles… what’s a cook to do with them? Let’s start with jam! I am guilty of opening several flavours of jam at once because MOODS… Thismeans an unruly crowd…

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Looking for a healthy alternative to potatoes that’s easy to grow, low-maintenance and suitable for those with dietary restrictions? Look no further than the Jerusalem artichoke! Also known as sunchokes, Jerusalem artichokes are hardy native Canadian perennials that can quickly get established in your garden patch. They are giants, growing sometimes 3 metres in height,…

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It’s been a cool and crisp September, with the earliest frosts I can remember— cold enough to get out the windshield scraper for the early morning drive to get milk.  The single-digit nighttime temperatures combined with an active hurricane season have sent East Coast gardeners into a predictable panic. Their Instagram accounts are overflowing with…

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This Saturday morning, like millions of parents of school-aged children around the world, I woke up to another day in COVID mode, musing, “What are we going to do today?” My question is echoed several minutes later by the arrival of my buoyant nine-year-old, who chirpily asks, “What are we doing this weekend?” It’s a…

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Friends, I am so happy to tell you that I am going into the studio tomorrow to begin recording the audio version of my book, Lost and Found: Recovering Your Spirit After A Concussion. It is important to me that I share this work with my fellow concussion alumni in a format that is compatible…

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May 2nd, 2013 is a significant date for me: six years ago on that day, I fell and hit my head at the gym, and so began my acquaintance with concussion. I’ve learned that our brains hold on to significant dates—some benign, like birthdays, and some painful, like the date we lost a loved one…

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For Maritimers, May means the beautiful and widely-anticipated unfurling of the ostrich fern, otherwise known as the fiddlehead, whose name accurately reflects the shape of that musical instrument.

Especially renowned in New Brunswick, along the banks of the Saint John river, but actually found throughout the Maritimes and New England, these bright green gems like to hide themselves in wet and wild places, making them a forager’s delightful surprise discovery. Once discovered, like their springtime companion, the mayflower, foragers keep tight-lipped about their whereabouts. “Where’s your patch?” is a question you should never ask if you are a dinner guest at a forager’s house and happen to find fiddleheads nestled on your plate.

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If you’re a seasonal eater here on the perpetually soggy East Coast, spring means three things: fiddleheads, asparagus, and rhubarb.

I’m going to spend the next couple of weeks singing the praises of each member of this marvellous trio in turn, mainly in the form of favourite recipes. I’ll start with the ‘barb since it’s the only one that’s visible in my garden right now.

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